July 1925 - December 1970
Gus Wilson's Model Garage
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Life & Times - Page 204

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 THE AUTHOR      CHARACTERS       BACK TO THE BEGINNING  LIST OF STORIES

GUS'S PREMIERE    SHOP   DEMEANOR    FAMILY    HEART   IS GUS REAL?    FRIENDS    Regulars    Joe 

Popular Science Monthly - July 1955  p204         Scan of original article (pdf format)

The Life and Times of Gus Wilson

(continued from page 202)

him along to be a fine mechanic. In 1943, a timid 15 year old began helping out after school; his name was Stan Hicks. Gus promoted Stan to full-time mechanic in 1948, and Greg Jones took over the pumps and grease rack.

There were many regular customers; Agatha Tarlin, who baffled Stan by demanding "petrol"; Mr. Spinker, who loathed people who didn't get his name right; Jason Evants, who wore sneakers and thought his car was fond of him; Senator Bombey, who gave cigars only to persons of voting age; Mrs. Miller who always made Gus happy that he was a bachelor; and Kiskum, a Bohemian with an odd accent ("Me displeased person-displeased by landlord-no kesh!")

Over the years Gus has occasionally given glimpses into his unrecorded past.  He was wounded in World War I ("I didn't duck quick enough"), and he did some successful motorcycle racing in the early Twenties.  Once in 1930 he helped a youth hot up what seems to have been a Stutz so that it won back-road scratch race. His mechanical skill isn't limited to autos; he has deftly repaired a number of trucks and tractors, a fire engine, an airplane, a motorcycle, a cabin cruiser, an outboard motor, and a power lawnmower.

Joe was here. Martin Bunn has conspicuously not reported on Joe Clark recently.  But Joe is-or was-both half owner of the Model Garage and for more than a quarter of a century Gus's best friend.  Joe was last seen in June, 1949 when his nephew took him for a plane hop and the weather closed in so suddenly that only frantic work by Gus and Jerry Corcoran got them down safely.  It may be that Joe retired t Florida, comfortable on his half of the modest but steady profits.  Or it may be that Doc Marvin, finding that he has a bum ticker, has told him to take things easier.  In any event, Joe is alive and well somewhere.  In the bright and busy world of the Model Garage that is assured.  

END

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